CICERO Systems™
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Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

The Greeks and Romans

In this lesson, students will identify the similarities and differences between the ancient Greeks and American citizens, their beliefs or values and human characteristics that are believed to be the foundation of a successful democracy. The students will explore how the philosophies of the ancient Greeks influenced the development of our nation.

Duration:1-3 periods

Lesson 2

Machiavelli and Hobbes

The class will be divided into three groups for the purposes of completing research, analyzing of philosophies and role play. Students will create persuasive presentations and draw conclusions on the ideals of a "proper society" as believed by Niccolo Machiavelli and Thomas Hobbes.

Duration:1-2 periods

Lesson 3

Medieval England

This lesson will explore how the church and state interacted in Medieval England and debate which of the two governing systems provided citizens with true justice.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 4

The Magna Carta

This lesson encourages students to identify the rights of property and due process outlined in the Magna Carta and relate them to the rights of American citizens today ensured by the United States Bill of Rights. The students will also compare and contrast the Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, and the English Bill of Rights.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 5

The Petition of Rights

In this lesson, the students will identify the rights called for in the Magna Carta and Petition of Rights. In two groups, Coke Parliamentarians and the Hobbesian members of the King’s Privy Council, the students will develop persuasive oral presentations on the rights of citizens.

Duration:1-3 periods

Lesson 6

English Bill of Rights

In this lesson students will compare and contrast the English Bill of Rights with the American Bill of Rights.  Students will be divided into 5 different groups to research documents that outline individual rights.  A trial will then be held in the classroom with the instructor acting as judge and the students ultimately deciding which document best protects the rights of individuals.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 1

Globalization

This lesson examines the changes that occurred as a result of increased global interaction beginning in the fifteenth century. As a point of reference, students will begin with an exploration of current trends in globalization, relying largely on their own knowledge of the world in which they live. Through a guided research activity, students will then explore a similar juncture in history, often referred to as the First Global Age. The culminating activity is a structured, formal essay.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 2

Motivations of Explorers

In this lesson, students in small groups will research a given European explorer (1450-1650) for various details including the motivations for their expedition. The students will then determine if single or multiple motivations bring facilitate greater accomplishments among people.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 3

Researching Explorers

This lesson directs students in the research of a given explorer (1450-1650). The students are expected to focus on finding various details of the explorer's motivation, who funded their voyage, expedition, accomplishments and the reaction of the sponsoring country. The students will use the information to develop a creative oral presentation for assessment.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 4

Tools of Explorers

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity for hands on learning. Students will recreate a map similar to that used by sixteenth century explorers. The students will study and compare cartography from the sixteenth century to cartography in the twenty-first century. Student will also apply creative writing skills in the form of a journal entry from a sixteenth century explorer.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 1

City Upon a Hill

In this lesson, students will work in small groups to analyze the sermon, City Upon a Hill, by John Winthrop. The students will use a writing response format to explain if and how modern American society exemplifies the ideals set forth within John Winthrop's sermon.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 2

Colonial Diversity

In this lesson, students will explore characteristics of the early colonists that aided in their motivation to begin a new life and their ability to adapt to a new environment. Did immigrants from various countries display the same characteristics? How did the immigrants react to one another's various ideals and ways of life? How did diversity of these early colonist contribute to the development of our nation today?

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

Colonists and Indians

In this lesson, students will explore the interaction, both positive and negative, between indigenous tribes of North America, how they related to the colonists and what impact these relationships had on the French and Indian War.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 4

Pennsylvania Charter of Privileges

Using Primary Sources, the students will analyze the Charter of Privileges, granted by William Penn in 1701 to the citizens of Pennsylvania, and draw connections to the creation of the Liberty Bell in 1751. The students will also compare and contrast the Charter of Privileges to the rights of citizens outlined the United States Constitution of 1787.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 5

Origins of the Seven Years War

In this lesson, students will investigate the connection between the Seven Years War in Europe and the French and Indian War in America. What were the events that led to these wars? How various colonies engage in this conflict? How did the British help the American colonies during this challenging time?

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 6

The War That Made George Washington

How do you characterize George Washington? Is he a hero for being involved in two military victories? OR Did he initiate a war that was not inevitable? The students will take a position about George Washington and provide evidence for their characterization by examining events leading to the onset of the French and Indian War.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 7

Consequences of the Seven Years’ War

In this lesson, students will determine the events that initiated the slow change of relationship between the colonies and Britain following The French and Indian War. Could these events be justified as the catalysts which paved the path from the Seven Years War to the American Revolution?

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 1

Provisions for the Troops at Valley Forge

This lesson emphasizes problem solving and critical thinking skills. Working cooperatively, students will first assume the role of a Revolutionary War task force charged with devising a viable plan that will save the troops at Valley Forge from starvation. Students will then discover what course of action was actually taken that winter. Finally, students must take and defend a position.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 2

Shay's Rebellion

This lesson examines the causes and impact of, as well as responses to Shays’ Rebellion. First, students combine prior knowledge with secondary source analysis to gain a better understanding of the circumstances that led to the revolt. Then, students analyze primary source documents that demonstrate two very different reactions to the rebellion. Finally, students will decide whether or not Shays’ actions were justified and construct an argument defending their position.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

The Three Documents

In this lesson, students will analyze and compare three documents fundamental to the protection of natural rights: the Declaration of Independence, the United States Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man. Students begin the analysis of one of the documents individually before engaging in a jigsaw activity. This lesson satisfies Common Core Standards for literacy in history.

Duration:1-3 Periods

Lesson 4

The American vs the French Revolution

This lesson promotes critical thinking through reasoned debate. First, students build background knowledge through reading and research. Then, students must work as a team to build a logical argument based upon the evidence gathered. Finally, students must chose and defend their own position in writing. This lesson should be completed after students have studied both the American Revolution and the French Revolution in some detail.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

Washington's First Inaugural Address

In this lesson, student will analyze George Washington's First Inaugural Address and identify the three points in which he expresses concern for the newly developing country, the United States of America.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 2

The Bill of Rights

In this lesson, students will examine the differences between rights, privilege and licence. The students will analyze why the Bill of Rights was later included in the United States Constitution.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

The Louisiana Purchase

In this lesson, students will briefly review the area of and reasons surrounding the land transaction between America and France known as the Louisiana Purchase. An in depth evaluation of the constitutional issues of the Louisiana Purchase include whether President Thomas Jefferson acted beyond his authority in handling the transaction. Students will analyze Primary Source letters and complete research to find evidence to support their point of view.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 4

The Embargo Act

In this lesson, students will examine the reasons for Thomas Jefferson's support of the Embargo Act of 1807. Are there any similarities between the events of the Embargo Act and America's current foreign relations with Mid-Eastern oil producing countries?

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 5

The American System

What was the American System, who was it proposed by and when was it established? Students will be able to answers to these and other important questions. Students will compare and contrast the economic perspectives of the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans and determine if today's government still follows the principles of the American System.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 7

The Missouri Compromise

In this lesson, students will examine why slavery was such an important issue in the development of westward expansion. Students will engage in a role play activity to understand how a governing body might work toward a compromise between to very differing points of view.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 8

The Monroe Doctrine

What was the original intention of the Monroe Doctrine, to protect the United States from threat or to expand United States influence? In what three events of American history was the Monroe Doctrine been put into effect? This lesson provides various opportunities for students to explore these and other important aspects of the Monroe Doctrine through map creation and narrative writing.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

Indian Removal

In this lesson, students will explore the controversy surrounding President Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal policy. Using primary sources, students will read the words of those involved, and compare the viewpoints of Jackson, Cherokee leaders, and other leading politicians. Students will analyze and assess these arguments, then use them to form their own. After exploration and discussion, students will place the legacy of Indian Removal, culminated by the Trail of Tears, in the history of United States relations with Native Americans.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 2

Northern Industry

What were the major issues the United States would face as industry increased during the 19th Century? Mass production, child labor, environmental effects, transportation...How would industry, government and society address these factors? Students will investigate northern industry and use quotes from historical figures to determine if industry would improve life in the United States or create more problems.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 3

The Lowell Mills

A new life of independence, a chance to help support the family... Were these points of interest enough to balance out the hard life and conditions of the Lowell Mills? What were the various duties the girls were required to complete? What precautions were in place to keep the girls safe while working with large machinery? Students will read an account from Harriet Robinson telling about her life as Lowell Mills girl.

Duration:2-4 periods

Lesson 4

Conquest of the West

In this multi-day lesson, students will investigate the events of westward expansion such as the Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark Expedition, Trail of Tears, Mexican-American War, Oregon Trail, Gold Rush, Texas War of Independence, and the Treaty of Ft. Laramie. Students will use the information they researched to creatively construct a timeline of these events. Students will later determine how these events are interrelated and connect to the American ideal of Manifest Destiny.

Duration:2-3 periods

Lesson 2

The Underground Railroad

Fact vs. Fiction...In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to examine research about the Underground Railroad and famous historical figures such as Harriet Tubman and Peg Leg Joe to distinguish what is fact and what is myth. Students will have an opportunity to create a fictional newspaper article about a slave from Maryland who dreams of freedom in Canada.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

The Know Nothing Party

In this lesson, students will identify the growing tensions between the immigrants and the American Party (Know-Nothing Party) of the 1850's. Using the song lyrics to "Wide Awake Jordan" and Paddy's Fight with the Know-Nothings" and CICERO Signature Strategy A.R.t.I.S.T., students will analyze the events and struggles portrayed in the songs and connect them with the events of the time period.

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 5

The Kansas-Nebraska Act

The focus of this lesson will revolve around the use of Primary Sources. The students will examine the points of the Kansas Nebraska Act of 1854 and investigate the Bleeding Kansas events that followed in response. Using the CICERO Signature Strategy A.R.T.I.S.T., the students will analyze Senator Sumner's speech "Crime Against Kansas."

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 6

Northern Industry

Students will be presented with two quotes from historical figures, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton, with differing points of view on the economic growth of the United States. Students will investigate and debate which of the two varying points of view prevailed and path the United States took toward progress.

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 7

Lincoln's First Inaugural Address

In this lesson, students will investigate the historical significance of the Election of 1860 and its connection to the session of the southern states. Students will review and analyze and identify the main points of Lincoln's First Inaugural Address

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 1

The War Democrats

 In this lesson, students will consider the role of the opposition party during times of war. Was the Civil War an atypical event, and if so how did this affect the unity of the Democratic Party? In addition, what might lead General George McClellan, the man who organized the Army of the Potomac, to run against President Abraham Lincoln as a Peace Democrat? 

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 2

The British Reaction

 In this lesson, students will identify the reasons why the members of the British Parliament were divided in their decision to support the Union or Confederacy during the American Civil War. Students will examine the aspects of the Trent Affair and draw conclusions on who the British should have supported during the American Civil War, the Union or the Confederacy. 

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 3

The French Reaction

 In this lesson, students will consider the Civil War from the perspective of a European power. How would the outcome, either a Union victory or a Confederate, affect French foreign policy and designs on a world empire? Students will also consider how the French, during various points in the war, might favor one side or another according to their own national interests. 

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 4

The Confederate Government

 In this lesson, students will consider the motivations, creation, and legitimacy of the Confederate government. Why did the Southern states secede from the Union? How did their new government compare to the one they had just abandoned? Students will also assume the roles of unionists and secessionists, and take turns arguing for or against the new government. 

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 5

The Emancipation Proclamation

 In this lesson, students will explore the context and consequences of the Emancipation Proclamation? Where did Lincoln seek to free slaves? Where did he seek to leave them alone? Students will also consider the Emancipation Proclamation as an act of abolition as well as a military strategy. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 6

The Battle of Fredericksburg

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to explore the events of the Battle of Fredericksburg by analyzing visual resources. The students will also develop a creative newspaper article informing citizens of the events of the battle from either a southern or northern perspective.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 7

The Battle of Gettysburg

In this lesson, students will explore the events of the Battle of Gettysburg and determine why it was such a crucial turning point in the Civil War. By creating alternate battle scenarios, students will determine how these new events would have effected the outcome at Gettysburg.

Duration:

Lesson 8

The Gettysburg Address

 In this lesson, students will analyze the writing style exhibited by President Lincoln's Gettysburg Speech. In his eloquent speech, that lasted no more than two minutes, he clearly captured the audience with his focus and tone memorializing soldiers who fell in battle and relating the past to the present and future. Students will identify events in history that connect to Lincoln's references and develop. They will also create an original speech that conveys appropriate tone for a Veteran's Day celebration. 

Duration:1 Period

Lesson 9

Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to compare and contrast Abraham Lincoln's First and Second Inaugural Addresses. How did Lincoln's tone change from his speech in 1861 to to 1865? What prompted this change? Students will be able to identify how Lincoln's perspective changed over time in response to the ongoing events of the time.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

Effects of the Homestead Act

Students will gain an understanding of how and why the government motivated citizens to take advantage of the opportunities of the Homestead Act of 1862. Students will also investigate the challenges faced by families as they became pioneers of the west.

Duration:3-4 Periods

Lesson 2

Conquest of the West

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to work both individually and in small groups to identify and assess major historical events from 1860-1900 that greatly impacted the westward expansion of our nation. Students will then creatively construct a timeline to showcase the information they researched and as a group present their final project to the class.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

Building the Transcontinental Railroad

The 1860s were a very challenging time for our nation. The issue of slavery, secession of southern states from the Union and the outbreak of the Civil War created a deep rift between the northern and southern states. Many families found themselves divided over political issues and fighting each other on the battlefield. What good could come out of this very difficult time? Students will engage in outlining the pros and cons of building the Transcontinental Railroad during this challenging time. They will also assess the effects the completed railroad had upon society and the companies that were involved in this technological advancement.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 4

Irish Immigration

America, the “Land of Opportunity.” Many people from Europe immigrated to America to leave their troubles behind and begin a new life for their family. Irish immigrants were some of the poorest people in Europe and funding a trip to America was very expensive. What were the “push and pull” factors of Irish immigration to the United States? Would they find freedom and prosperity? Compare and contrast their lives with the challenges of today’s young people.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 5

Italian Immigration

This lesson encourages students to work in groups to research and analyze the “push and pull” factors of Italian immigration. The students will individually apply their essay writing skills to create a three paragraph essay based upon their research which follows a given format.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 6

Jewish Immigration

 In this lesson, students will investigate the "push" and "pull" factors that Jewish people immigrated to the United States from various countries. As new residents to the United States was life easier than in their homelands? What challenges did they face? Were they welcomed by established communities? Was is easy or difficult for them to find employment to support their families? Students will also explore what contributions Jewish immigrants have made to American Society. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 7

Labor Unions

 What are Labor Unions and what do they do? Do they provide more benefits or consequences for employee and employers? How do they operate? These are all questions that students will investigate and complete a compare and contrast between the protocol of Congress and Labor Unions. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 8

Police Forces

 What was the role of urban police forces during the nineteenth century? How well did they uphold their duties? Did any factors influence the manner in which they conducted themselves? Students will investigate if and how police forces reacted to pressure by one political party or another. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 9

Street Gangs

How prevalent were street gangs during the 1800's? Students will explore how and why street gangs formed and draw conclusions pertaining to their role as a benefit or harm to society in American cities. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 10

The Banking Industry

 In this lesson, students will identify J.P. Morgan's contributions to the banking industry. They will also investigate how banks benefit citizens and also make a profit. During the late 1800's and early 1900's banks played an important role in the growth of industry. Students will focus their research on the relationship between banks and railroad companies. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 11

The Oil Industry

 This lesson focuses on the development and growth of Standard Oil. Students will be able to identify monopolies of the early 1900s and research how they impacted society. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 12

The Steel Industry

 During the late 1800's and early 1900's, the production of steel was an important advancement that provided building resources for factories and development of cities. In this lesson, students will investigate the pros and cons of the steel industry and the main people involved in its growth. 

Duration:1-3 Periods

Lesson 13

Urban Political Machines

 In this lesson, students will explore the impact political machines had upon the growth of cities during the early 1900's. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

Radical Darwinism

In this lesson students will learn that the upper classes looked to science for support of their successes. Probably the most hotly argued scientific theory of the time was the Theory of Evolution, Charles Darwin proposed in 1859. A well-known variation of Darwin’s biology was “Social Darwinism.” Proponents of Social Darwinism argued that society, like animals in nature, is a highly competitive environment, and the Darwinian concept of natural selection favors the strong and the crafty over the weak and the slow. They argued that animals, or people, surviving by dominating or destroying others are not immoral. It is just the way life is and results in the betterment of the species as a whole. Radical Darwinists will take this idea to a new level by supporting the idea of Eugenics as a science that demands that the lesser examples of humanity be eliminated creating a purer human race.  The best example of Racial Darwinism will be Hitler’s ‘Final Solution’.

Duration:1-3 periods

Lesson 2

The Open Door Policy

 In this lesson students will learn about Secretary of State John Hay's  famous "Open Door Notes." These notes, first established within the American government, eventually were sent to the nations who had an interest in opening China to trade: Great Britain, France, Germany, Russia, and Japan.

Hay argued in his Open Door Notes that to create a fair and balanced trade market all nations should be allowed equal and open trade into China. Many of these nations had already opened segments of Chinese ports and were very supportive of this American policy. While no nation officially signed a treaty with the United States nor did they receive the approval of the Chinese government, the Open Door Policy became the standard practice by which nations treated China.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

Madison Grant

Students will learn about Madison Grant, a Progressive, but also an advocate of Racial Darwinism, as were many of his contemporaries Adolf Hitler called Grant's writings "my Bible" and celebrated Grant as a genius and a visionary. In the Holocaust Hitler and the Nazis carried out the horrible, logical implementation of Grant's racial views. The Holocaust forced the Caucasian population of Europe and the Americas to rethink what had been the accepted, unquestioned, attitude about race and ethnic background for generations.  

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 4

Theodore Roosevelt

In this lesson students will learn about Theodore Roosevelt, a man of many skills and talents who overcame great hardship to lead the United States at the turn of the 20th century.  The legacies left by Theodore Roosevelt are still felt today through our international leadership, foreign policy, military strength, conservatism and philanthropy.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 5

The Conservationists

 In this lesson, students will identify the key people who helped to develop conservation programs for land and wildlife in the United States during the early 20th Century. What programs were developed and how did these programs influence modern day conservation organizations? Students will have an opportunity to explore various modern day organizations and activists. Students will then develop a position paper on the mission of these organizations how they have impacted society. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 6

Monongah Mining Disaster 1907

 The Monongah Coal Mine disaster of 1907 was the worst mining crisis in history. Students will examine the events that contributed to this disaster and its effect on the community, future protocol at mining companies and West Virginia commerce. Why did the number of casualties reported seemed to fluctuate? Why was there such a high percentage of immigrants involved in this crisis? What benefits would outweigh the risk of personal safety on a job site? Students will research evidence to answer these important questions. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 7

Woodrow Wilson

 In this lesson, students will examine Woodrow Wilson's Presidency and identify his major accomplishments, disappointments and frustrations. How did these factors correlate to the various progressive movements of the early 20th Century? Have modern political parties been influenced by the progressive movements of the past? 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 8

Unneutral Neutrality

 President Woodrow Wilson took the position of neutrality in 1914 regarding American involvement in World War I. However, the tide turned and American entered the war to support the Allied Forces. Students will compare and contrast President Wilson's war messages from 1914 and 1917 and write a position paper using evidence from research to support their idea regarding America's true intentions for involvement in the war. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 9

Women's Suffrage

 In this lesson, students will analyze and reference various landmark documents and Supreme Court decisions regarding women's rights from the colonial days to the 20th century. Using evidence found in these primary sources, students will work in pairs to create a persuasive speech defending their position on the following question: Were women's rights denied consciously or as a result of the changing role of women in society? 

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 10

Nationalized Industry

 With the onset of World War I in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to keep the United States neutral. Soon, that effort became more and more difficult to uphold. In this lesson, students examine the reasons the United States entered the war. Students will also work in groups to research and role play one of organized wartime agencies. Groups will develop a report for President outlining the guidelines their agency and what the agency would need to do to prepare for and contribute to the war effort. 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 13

Post War Economy 1920

 Throughout history, a pattern can been traced of economic impact following war. Mostly, the impact tends to be more negative, one of debt, recession and slowing commerce. Students will research evidence to outline the impact of World War I on American society and compare and contrast its aftermath to wars of the past and future. Students will also investigate if the economic impact following a war is ever benefit to a particular industry? 

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

Post War Economic Rebound

In this lesson, students will explore the aspects of the federal economic system such as taxes, government spending and national debt. Students will also analyze how Andrew Melon, Secretary of the Treasury during the 1920's, influenced the American economy.

Duration:6-7 Periods

Lesson 2

Modern Machines

In this lesson, students will explore the technology of the 1920's specifically cars, radio and airplanes. Students will investigate how each impacted society both positively and negatively. Students will use their imagination to create invention that would change society and develop a marketing plan to promote the sales.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 3

Sports in the 1920s

In this lesson, students will research and identify popular sports and sports figures of the 1920's. Students will explore the impact sports had upon society during that time era.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 4

Record Prosperity

In this lesson, students will explore the economic success of the 1920's, prior to the Stock Market Crash of 1929. They will develop and deliver a detailed speech outlining the Republican economic policies of the era. Students will also compare and contrast the economic policies of Presidents Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 6

The Great Depression

The future looked promising for America when Herbert Hoover became president in 1929. However, just seven months after President Herbert Hoover’s inauguration, the bottom fell out of years of Republican prosperity. The Hoover administration had hardly begun when the country suffered the worst business crash in its history. It was October 24, 1929, Black Thursday. On that day, John Kenneth Galbraith wrote, “12, 8894,650 shares changed hands, many of them at prices that shattered the dreams and the hopes of those who had owned them.” The following Tuesday, October 29, desperate speculators sold 16, 400,000 shares of stocks. The Great Depression had begun.

Duration:3-4 Periods

Lesson 8

The Good Neighbor Policy

In this lesson, students will analyze the politics of the Good Neighbor Policy instituted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and compare United States relations with Latin America before and after the policy. Students will explore the geography of Latin America through research.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

America's First Isolationists

In this lesson, students will describe the policy of American Isolationism that was adopted following World War I. What was the purpose of this policy and how would it effect United States involvement in foreign diplomatic and political issues and conflicts? Would it have an effect the United States' economic involvement with countries in Europe or other nations? The students will discuss the following:Under this policy, was it realistic for the United States to expect to remain neutral toward World War II as the conflict became a more global issue? Should the United States have stepped in earlier to help suppress fascist aggression?

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 2

New Deal Isolationists

In this lesson, students will discuss the term "isolationist" and determine how that idea played a role in when the United States engaged in World War II. Students will be divided into small groups, each representing a population of American citizens. The students must determine what point of view each group of citizens would have regarding United States involvement in World War II. They must present their point of view to a student portraying President Roosevelt. Will their argument be strong enough to convince President Roosevelt to either engage in war or remain neutral?

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 3

The Japanese in Nanking

Is there a "code of conduct" during times of war? In this lesson, students will examine the acts of violence imposed upon the citizens of Nanking, China during the Japanese occupation of 1937. The students will determine if Japanese commanding officers and their troops should have upheld a "code of conduct." Who should be held accountable for these war crimes and were they just-fully convicted?

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 4

The Appeasement of Germany

In this lesson, students will identify and describe Nazi Germany's aggressive acts in Europe during the 1930's. Which countries were targeted? What was the reaction of Great Britain and France? The students will research the reasons why countries did not engage Germany and discuss the outcome of the Munich Agreement. Was appeasing Germany the right decision? Students will debate this question and provide evidence to support their position.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 5

Germany Conquers

In this lesson, students will define and discuss the differences between the following: argument, persuasion and propaganda. Using this information, students will have an opportunity to choose and analyze a World War II poster, from CICERO's Gallery, to identify its purpose and effects on its audience.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 6

Pearl Harbor

In this lesson, students will research the basic facts on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor 1941. What prompted this attack? Using the information gathered, students will conduct a debate between the American and Japanese perspective of the events leading up to and including the attack on Pearl Harbor. In conclusion, the students will draw connections between the attack on Pearl Harbor and the 9/11 attacks of 2001.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 7

The Battle of Midway

In this lesson, students will explore the events that took place in the Pacific Theater of World War II. What were the Japanese motives and strategies for war? In which battles did they achieve victory? How was the Battle of Midway different? Why was this particular battle coined "the turning point of the war in the Pacific ?" Students will respond to these and other key points about the Battle of Midway in essay format.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 9

Why Truman Dropped the Bomb

In this lesson, student will research the options President Harry Truman considered to help bring an end to World War II and develop a list of pros and cons of the United States' final decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Students will role play a meeting of the United Nations, with representatives from various nations, to discuss their concern or support for the use of atomic bombs to end the war.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 10

The Atomic Age

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to research one of the seven influential leaders of the Atomic Age. Using the information gathered, students will create a memoir writing based upon facts, quotes and other journal entries about that person. The students will be given a memoir writing rubric for guidance.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 11

Model United Nations

In this activity, students will examine the formation of the United Nations. Students will research an assigned country and create a folder about that specific country's involvement in the United Nations. 

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 1

The Korean War

In this lesson, student will explore the reasons why societies have engaged in war throughout time. Could conflicts be resolved in a manner other than war? What would the world be like if nations were able to keep peace between each other? The students will identify the reasons causes of the Korean War. How did this conflict affect citizens around the world?

Duration:1-3 Periods

Lesson 2

The Civil Rights Movement

In this lesson, students will identify and describe various events, both positive and negative, of the Civil Rights Movement. The students will review the Declaration of Independence, particularly the second paragraph on the Natural Rights of Man, and determine if events that occurred during the Civil Rights Movement applied the principles of the Declaration of Independence and upheld the Natural Rights of Man.

Duration:2-3 Periods

Lesson 4

Nuclear Proliferation

Which countries have the technology to generate nuclear weapons? If detonated, what level of destruction would a nuclear weapon leave behind? Is the knowledge of this technology safe in the hands of all political leaders around the world? How can we ensure that this technology is used responsibly? In this lesson, students will explore the answers to these questions, review the Non-Nuclear Proliferation Treaty of 1970 and create a modern version of the treaty.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 1

The War on Terror

In this lesson, students will identify and discuss the Islamic beliefs of Al Qaeda and how they differ from the cultures and beliefs of the United States. Students will use geography skills to locate countries where Al Qaeda has a strong presence and discuss how the why and how of Al Qaeda's hostile attacks on the United States.

Duration:1-2 Periods

Lesson 2

The World is Flat Again

We live in an age where technology has drastically changed the way we communicate and conduct business both locally and globally. Today, communication can be done almost instantly through email and electronic transactions. In this lesson, students will explore how technology has changed our perception of a world with distant cultures and economies to a world where global communication is the norm.